Sports

Johnny Bower, 1924–2017

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The Grey Cup and Other Things

Exhibition Stadium in 1959 [CNE Archives, Public Domain]

In the wake of yesterday’s Grey Cup, a few things came to my mind:

  • gridiron football in the snow is amazing
  • all future Grey Cups should be played in the snow
  • the last two times the Grey Cup has been played in the snow were both won by the Toronto Argonauts
  • the Maritimes deserve a CFL team or two
  • the CFL is the last North American major league that has resisted merging with its US counterpart
  • Canadian interest in NFL has steadily increased over the years while American interest in the NFL has declined
  • CTE remains is a huge issue that must be resolved
  • the CFL should see a viewership increase after this game, but
  • the CFL has seen its audience shrunk tremendously over the past few decades
  • the Argos used to have bigger digs than BMO Field

(more…)

1972 Summit Series Souvenir


A little something that I found while researching the 1972 Summit Series back in December 2016, a complaint letter from the Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau about the exclusion of Bobby Hull, who then played in the WHA.

Source: National Archives of Canada/ Hockey Canada Fonds/ MG28-I263/ e001217383

CBC TV coverage of Toronto Raptors

Is it just me or is coverage of the Raptors almost non-existent on CBC television—especially with regards to The National—when the Raptors are Canada’s only major league basketball team, when they’re in contention for a major league championship, and when minor details about the Leafs—such as an overtime game for a meaningless game that they would lose anyways—would have been mentioned back in the day by no less than Peter Mansbridge?

On the “Sweet Science”

To the untrained eye most boxing matches appear not merely savage but mad. As the eye becomes trained, however, the spectator begins to see the complex patterns that underlie the “madness”; what seems to be merely confusing action is understood to be coherent and intelligent, frequently inspired. Even the spectator who dislikes violence in principle can come to admire highly skillful boxing—to admire it beyond all “sane” proportions. A brilliant boxing match, quicksilver in its motions, transpiring far more rapidly than the mind can absorb, can have the power that Emily Dickinson attributed to great poetry: you know it’s great when it takes the top of your head off.

—Joyce Carol Oates, On Boxing, pg. 7