Amiga OS: Viability

I remember a friend of mine in grade school who owned an Amiga back in the years before Windows 95. The hardware specs of the machine were unknown to me, it may have been better than my family’s PC, but I don’t know. I distinctly remember being taken aback by AmigaOS 2’s greyscale colours and its strange GUI compared to Windows 3.1. Then we played some games on it, but without any cool graphics or music as the machine only had a basic PC speaker. Now, decades later, the AmigaOS is still around, though the latest release was back in 2012, and I still fail to see the viability of it.

With its limited selection of software, esp. 3D video games, and its limited support for modern consumer hardware, other than among hobbyists and diehard Amiga users in Europe what is the point? The AmigaOS, from what I’ve gathered, remains a proprietary OS that is locked in legal battles and that remains tied to the descendents of the same RISC-based PowerPC tech that Apple ditched in favour of faster and cheaper Intel CPUs. Meanwhile, Linux distros like Ubuntu or Debian and the Haiku OS are open source projects that are being actively developed to run on modern consumer PC hardware. Windows is everywhere, understandably, because it can do everything except be Windows. Between Windows, Mac OS X, and the Linux distros, what can the AmigaOS do distinctly, other than be used for musical composition and arrangement by Susumu Hirasawa?

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